#Climate Emergency motion, annotated version. #Manchester

A “Climate Emergency” motion will be debated and voted upon by the 96 elected members of Manchester City Council.  The debate takes place on Wednesday 10th July, at 10am, as part of the Full Council meeting, which members of the public are able to attend without pre-booking or payment.  We at Climate Emergency Manchester urge you to lobby your councillors to come out in support of this motion before the debate.  Details on how to find out who your councillors are, and suggestions of what you might say, are to be found here.

Below is the text of the motion, as it stands (on the day, amendments may be proposed, which either weaken or strengthen the motion).  In the third column are some comments.  If you yourself have comments, please either use the comments section under this blog, or else email us* on climateemergencymanchester@gmail.com

No. Text of the motion Comments
This Council notes:

●        The serious risks to Manchester’s people, of climate change/global heating affecting economic, social and environmental well-being, supply chains – including food security, financial systems and local weather, among many others.

Indeed. And to future generations, and to other species…
●        That in 2008 the ‘Principles of Tackling Climate Change in Manchester’ were agreed as a call to action to engage people from all walks of life in climate change action and, build support for a new way of thinking about climate change. Thank you Neil Swannick, the last really radical Executive Member for the Environment
●        That Manchester leads the way , with an agreed Paris compliant carbon budget set in December 2018 and an acceleration of the target for becoming a zero-carbon city by 12 years, setting 2038 as the new target for the city, based on research from the world-renowned Tyndall Centre for Climate Change. Whenever someone says “Paris compliant” remember this – even if by some miracle all the Paris pledges turned to deeds, we’d have about 3.4 degrees of warming. Also – ‘leads the way’? Um, ‘low carbon culture’, anyone?
●        The recent and welcome upsurge of action by the young people of Manchester, exemplifying the radical traditions of which Manchester is proud. Yes, pity the GMP don’t agree.
This Council agrees to:
1 Declare a Climate Emergency. Yay.  Forced into it because all the other core cities had already declared!
2 Continue working with partners across Manchester and GMCA to deliver the 2038 target, and determine if an earlier target can be possible, through a transparent and open review. How transparent and open the review actually is will be one to watch…
3 Become carbon neutral by the earliest possible date. Here is what the current Exec Member for the Environment said during her recent election campaign to retain her council seat – “…there is a strong argument that the target should be 2030, and I would like to see Manchester aiming for this, but of course we need to bring our partners in the economic activity of the city and above all the people we represent along with us as well”
4 Encourage involvement in all wards by April 2020 through meetings as part of the Our Manchester strategy, to identify residents and partners who want to be actively involved in achieving the target, with provision for those who cannot attend. Ensure ward plans contain specific, measurable, achievable steps. Our Manchester = “The Manchester Strategy sets a long-term vision for Manchester’s future and describes how we will achieve it.” Btw, that these residents and partners need – after ten years of ‘Steering Groups’ and ‘Agency’ bluster – to be identified, says something about how effective those groups have been, no?
5 Review all policies, processes and procedures to ensure the council can become carbon neutral
6 Present an action plan by March 2020 detailing how the city can stay within its carbon budget.
7 Report back regularly to the NESC.. NESC = Neighbourhoods and Environment Scrutiny Committee. It is one of the Council’s 6 Scrutiny Committees. It’s next meeting is on Weds July 17, at 2pm. Climate Emergency Manchester folks will be there., please join us!
8 Review the corporate plan
9 Work with the Tyndall Centre to review the actual emissions from aviation. Investigate the best way to include aviation in our overall carbon reduction programme in the long term. This could be extremely interesting
10 Make climate breakdown and the environment, an integral part of activity throughout the Council, including all decision making, ensuring key decisions take into account the impact on achieving the zero-carbon target and including an environmental impact assessment in all relevant committee reports. This is basically a re-statement of the low carbon culture goal – the second goal of the 2009 plan. No attempt was ever made to implement this
11 Ensure that everyone in the council receives carbon literacy training by the end of 2020. Make attendance easier by varying times and length of sessions. Carbon literacy was launched in 2012 by Richard Leese. In 2017 he finally did his training. #leadingbyexample
12 Encourage all staff on council business to use the lowest carbon, appropriate, travel. Watch this space…
13 Investigate measures to ensure future procurement is carbon neutral. Increase the percentage of social value with an additional environmental element.
14 Work with suppliers to green their supply chains, and support local production
15 Work with training providers to ensure Manchester residents can take on green jobs Excellent!
16 Investigate and introduce measures to help reach domestic zero carbon levels including addressing fuel poverty and retrofitting existing homes. This would be easier if the Conservative Government of David Cameron had not abolished the Zero Carbon Homes programme in 2015.
17 Investigate ways to ensure that future local plans place a mandatory requirement for all new development to be net zero carbon by the earliest possible date.
18 Push GMCA to decarbonise public transport, heat and energy as early as possible.
19 Through our role on GMPF, encourage divestment in fossil fuels as early as possible Wanna help make this happen?  Fossil Free Greater Manchester is the campaigning group for you…
Call on the government to:
20 Provide powers and resources to make the zero-carbon target possible including funding for big capital projects.
21 Accelerate the reduction of carbon emissions from aviation.
22 Accelerate the decarbonisation of the electricity grid, funding low carbon energy generation.
23 Ensure that the UK prosperity fund focuses on enabling the transition to a low carbon economy. “The Prosperity Fund aims to remove barriers to economic growth and promote the economic reform and development needed to reduce poverty in partner countries”  The one nod to Manchester/UK global responsibilities…

[Sole author of this blogpost = Marc Hudson]

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Text of July 10 #Climate Emergency motion to #Manchester City Council

This below, in italics, is the text the motion which will be debated at full Council on Wednesday 10th July. The meeting, held in the Town Hall extension (enter at the entrance on Mount St), is open to the public, no need to book, and begins at 10am.

ifullysupportPLEASE PLEASE PLEASE lobby your councilors to support this motion, and then let us know what they say.  More details, including how to find out who your councillors are, their emails and when they meet constitutents, are to be found here.. For example, we would love councillors to be asked to hold up a sheet of paper and have a photo taken with the above text in the image…

Climate Emergency Manchester is going to spend the coming months and years (yes, you read that right) making sure that promises made are kept and that new commitments are made as the situation (which at a global level is deteriorating rapidly) demands.  This is not glamorous work, but we can promise you that we will find ways for you to use your time, talents and passion well. It won”t always be high adrenaline, or high status, but it WILL be local, beyond-greenwash and meaningful.  If you’re interested, contact us via our get involved form.

The text of the motion is in bold, below the message which Councillor Annette Wright (Hulme) posted, which we have put in italics.

On 10th July I will be putting the motion below, on climate change, to a meeting of Manchester City Council, seconded by Eve Francis Holt. Eve had been working on a motion like this for months, but the way the system works, councillors are randomly chosen to move motions and my name was picked. Thanks very much to Eve for working with me on this. Its been a pleasure. Thanks also to all the people, more knowledgeable than me on this subject, who helped me.

I could have done a motion about anything, but residents in Hulme regularly raise environmental issues with me and I decided that there is no bigger or more important, issue at the moment. The council needs to consider climate change in everything it does and it has to have the structures in place to make sure that happens. The Labour Party nationally has been outlining its plans over the last few weeks and a socialist Labour government can do much to change the way these issues are looked at and set an example in the world.

I have worked with anyone and everyone I can on this, in the very short time I had to pull it together, and I hope it will be carried.

Here’s the motion, it’s been carefully considered but it’s not perfect. Please discuss!

“This Council notes:

The serious risks to Manchester’s people, of climate change/global heating affecting economic, social and environmental well-being, supply chains – including food security, financial systems and local weather, among many others.

That in 2008 the ‘Principles of Tackling Climate Change in Manchester’ were agreed as a call to action to engage people from all walks of life in climate change action and, build support for a new way of thinking about climate change.

That Manchester leads the way , with an agreed Paris compliant carbon budget set in December 2018 and an acceleration of the target for becoming a zero-carbon city by 12 years, setting 2038 as the new target for the city, based on research from the word-renowned Tyndall Centre for Climate Change.

The recent and welcome upsurge of action by the young people of Manchester, exemplifying the radical traditions of which Manchester is proud.

This Council agrees to:

Declare a Climate Emergency.

Continue working with partners across Manchester and GMCA to deliver the 2038 target, and determine if an earlier target can be possible, through a transparent and open review. Become carbon neutral by the earliest possible date.

Encourage involvement in all wards by April 2020 through meetings as part of the Our Manchester strategy, to identify residents and partners who want to be actively involved in achieving the target, with provision for those who cannot attend. Ensure ward plans contain specific, measurable, achievable steps.

Review all policies, processes and procedures to ensure the council can become carbon neutral. Present an action plan by March 2020 detailing how the city can stay within its carbon budget. Report back regularly to the NESC. Review the corporate plan.

Work with the Tyndall Centre to review the actual emissions from aviation. Investigate the best way to include aviation in our overall carbon reduction programme in the long term.

Make climate breakdown and the environment, an integral part of activity throughout the Council, including all decision making, ensuring key decisions take into account the impact on achieving the zero-carbon target and including an environmental impact assessment in all relevant committee reports.

Ensure that everyone in the council receives carbon literacy training by the end of 2020. Make attendance easier by varying times and length of sessions.

Encourage all staff on council business to use the lowest carbon, appropriate, travel.

Investigate measures to ensure future procurement is carbon neutral. Increase the percentage of social value with an additional environmental element.

Work with suppliers to green their supply chains, and support local production
Work with training providers to ensure Manchester residents can take on green jobs
Investigate and introduce measures to help reach domestic zero carbon levels including addressing fuel poverty and retrofitting existing homes.

Investigate ways to ensure that future local plans place a mandatory requirement for all new development to be net zero carbon by the earliest possible date.

Push GMCA to decarbonise public transport, heat and energy as early as possible.

Through our role on GMPF, encourage divestment in fossil fuels as early as possible

Call on the government to:

Provide powers and resources to make the zero-carbon target possible including funding for big capital projects.

Accelerate the reduction of carbon emissions from aviation.

Accelerate the decarbonisation of the electricity grid, funding low carbon energy generation.

Ensure that the UK prosperity fund focuses on enabling the transition to a low carbon economy.”

Open letter in support of 10th July Climate Emergency Motion

UPDATE: The form is now closed to further submissions, thanks for all your support. IF you want to get more involved you can lobby your councillors about the motion or fill in our handy “get involved” form.

You can see below the open letter CEM will be sending to the Manchester Evening News in the next week or so. If you’d like to add your name the list of signatories (can be either as an individual or as an organisation), please complete and submit the simple form below the letter.

If you’d like to get involved with our campaign in other ways large and small, we have a form for that as well!

NB – email address is needed for verification, but we will of course NOT be sharing that information with anyone.

“On Wednesday 10th July Manchester City Council will debate whether to declare a climate emergency. The motion has been put forward by a Hulme councillor, Annette Wright, and comes against the backdrop of ongoing climate strikes by children, the protests by Extinction Rebellion, a petition started in March by the “Climate Emergency Manchester” group,  and ever more alarming reports from scientists about climate breakdown.

Manchester City Council has long talked a good game on climate change, but the rhetoric has sometimes outstripped the reality.  The fault for some – but by no means all – of the gap can be laid at the door of central government. Over the last nine years Manchester has suffered huge cuts in funding.

This climate emergency motion provides a great chance to reboot engagement with all sectors of Manchester – business, but also trades unions, religious groups, community groups and the like.  We the undersigned urge Mancunians to contact their local councillors to ask them to support the motion, and we urge the Council to pass the motion unchanged, or with amendments that strengthen it rather than weaken it.

We also pledge to be critical and constructive allies of the council in the coming years as it turns the words of the motion into deeds.”

 

Half way there! 2000 signatures reached in #Climate Emergency petition #Manchester

A massive thank you to all those people out there who have been collecting signatures on sheets.  Between the 447 online and the ones on paper (1564 and counting) we are now … over halfway to the 4000 threshold.

 

As well as being able to take your sheets to the Sandbar, 120 Grosvenor St, you now can also take them to Patagonia, 51 King St (on the corner with Cross Street).  In both cases, please put the sheets in a sealed envelope labelled “Climate Emergency Petition” and give them to a member of staff.

We have updated the petition sheet to reflect that, and you can download the new version here.

When you are collecting signatures, please get people to give their FULL address.  A postcode is not enough.  What we are saying is “imagine your auntie was sending you a 50 pound note – what address would you want her to put?”

If you want to go out collecting but are daunted at the prospect, please get in touch – we can offer advice but we might also be able to pair you up with some other people so you can do it with them.  Here are two accounts of collecting signatures – in Levenshulme and in the City Centre.

DATE FOR YOUR DIARY: Weds 10th July, #Manchester City Council debates #Climate Emergency

On the morning of Wednesday 10th July, the full council meeting of Manchester City Council will debate a motion calling for the declaration of a climate emergency.

evefrancis climate emergency declarationThe motion is being put forward by two backbench councillors, Eve Francis and Annette Wright. The final text of the motion will be released at the latest by Wednesday 3rd July (hopefully sooner).

Climate Emergency Manchester is extremely keen that all councillors, across the 32 wards of Manchester City Council are lobbied politely, firmly and repeatedly by people who live in those wards. The motion needs to pass, and it needs to be as strong as possible.

PLEASE contact us, on either climateemergencymanchester@gmail.com or @climateemergmcr if you live in Manchester (any ward!) and want to be involved in this lobbying..

 

Regardless of how strong this motion is, and whether it passes, we will be continuing to collect signatures on our petition.

Interview about community-building, with Shelly Quinton-Hulme #Manchester #Stretford #Trafford

Environmental activists talk about movement-building and community-building a lot. We actually do it… less frequently. Climate Emergency Manchester has been able to interview one of the doers (thanks to Rose Arnold for putting us in touch). She’s Shelly Quinton-Hulme, and she kindly answered our questions. [If you know other people we should interview, get in touch!]

1. Who are you, what’s your background that has helped you become good at helping communities form, helping people knit together?

shelly quintonhulme
Shelly Quinton-Hulme

My name is Shelly Quinton-Hulme and I am 46 years old and am married with one son who is 12 years old. I have lived in Stretford since I was 6 years old and love it here. I grew up playing on Victoria Park along with my 2 brothers and neighbours. I work full-time for Network Rail as a Programme Controls professional. We set up the Friends of Victoria Park in 2002 in response to the park becoming so run down and neglected. My best friends dad ‘Norman Law’ organised a community meeting to see who would be interested in joining in to form a group to bring about improvements to the park and the group was born. Norman was the chair for the first few years and then I took over when his health started to become an issue and I have been the chair ever since. I am also the chairperson and founder member of Stretford Children’s Theatre [SCT] which also includes Stretford Youth Choir [SYC], a group that we re-formed in 2015. I was on the board of The Friends of Stretford Public Hall at the time and was instrumental in the team that won the hall back to public use from Trafford Council and one of the things I wanted to achieve was to restart SCT at the hall. One of the things about starting this group was that I needed to leave the hall board as my time was too stretched but they were in good hands and I’m still abreast of their plans etc as they are our venue for classes and performances and we work closely together. I am also Vice-Chair and Development Governor at Victoria Park Infant School – a role I really love as my family have a long history with this school and it is a fantastic school for our community. Until last year I was also involved in the scout group based in Victoria Park for 5 years and I looked after their fundraising and the building as well as practical help in the sessions through Beavers and Cubs with my son.

I think some of my innate abilities have helped me fulfil my roles in all these groups – none of which I knew I possessed at the time – but all have been developed over the years and now I can self-reflect I can see how it all happened and the good, the bad and the ugly of my personality!

  • I am tenacious – I will not let it lie. If I say I will do something I will and I expect the same from others – I will make sure that this expectation is met and I am an expert nagger!!
  • I am supremely organised – I can switch hats quite quickly and compartmentalise things well. Filing and good systems are important to ensure this is managed well.
  • I love processes / rules / procedures and even paperwork – I make sure this works to my advantage at all times. The way my brain works it needs to know what happens next and I like being in control and as such this all works in my favour. I do like a controlled process which I can navigate easily and I do not find filling in forms a problem and as such tasks that require this and can bog down other people tend to fall to me to do.
  • I will stick up for what I believe in – and I really believe in community and Stretford as a great place to live
  • I think I am easy to talk to and I will talk to anybody and everybody about things I am passionate about.
  • I am strong willed and am sometimes seen as ‘scary’ – again I use this to my advantage as and when is necessary!
  • I am opinionated – you will rarely see me sitting on the fence – but this has not always worked in my favour – as it has lost me friends over the years, but I think it has also gained me and my groups a reputation for being ‘straight up’.
  • I love watching our community grow and linking up people with similar interests, signposting to groups, and watching our children grow up in a place better than it was with more opportunities.
  • I enjoy the challenge of taking a group that is not running successfully and turning it around, and or setting up a new group to fulfil a need – and now that I have experience in it , it is much easier and quicker to complete this process.

2. Can you give us some examples of things that have gone well, and why you think they went well?
The Friends of Victoria Park is my first love as a community group and the park will always be my baby! This group taught me how groups work and function and how people relate to others and I have learned so much from it. I have been able to transfer knowledge from this group to other groups and I keep learning all the time.

Some things I have learned that work well are:

  • Have realistic expectations about what volunteers will give time wise – people will not all be as committed to the group as perhaps you are, but will give varying degrees of time, energy and effort and each bit is as necessary to create the goal and should be rewarded.
  • Have realistic expectations about what you can achieve in the timescales – be able to adapt your plans or expectations as necessary
  • Find out what your volunteers are interested in and then ensure that they are involved in that aspect if possible – they are far more likely to engage and deliver if they are having fun
  • Remember that volunteers are volunteers and as such must enjoy it or else they will stop volunteering – THIS IS NOT WORK – SO MAKE IT FUN!
  • Always remember why you are doing something and that everyone knows why you are doing it so that there is a shared purpose – people are much more likely to engage
  • Ask for help and advice when you need it – is there a group doing a similar thing that can help you so you don’t have to re-invent the wheel
  • Ask people for specific help / targeting areas as people are more likely to help on the basis of doing a specific task rather than a nebulous call for help.
  • Lots of things can be achieved with a small amount of cash if you have a good level of volunteer support

3. Relatedly, what advice would you offer to people keen to get communities ‘mobilised’ and active around issues (whether it was local traffic calming, litter, noise, anything)
If you want something to change then you have to be a part of that change. If you are passionate about the issue then turn that passion into people power and start to mobilise your friends who feel the same way – this is how movements start – it’s just a group of people who feel the same way! Don’t think that someone else will do it or is more capable or less busy than you are – you will probably surprise yourself and it is a great way to find out your talents and strengths. My advice – just do it and start knocking that red tape out of the way to make the change you want.

4. Without mentioning any names, what things do you see people who want to get communities mobilised doing that are counter-productive, that make you wince?
I think the behaviour that I see that is most counter-productive is one of suggesting ‘entitlement’ – we deserve this. I think this strategy puts people’s back up and stops them wanting to get involved and sometimes can even lead them into not helping, even if it is fundamentally a good idea! I think the best strategy is demonstrating the positives that will be achieved by the change and highlighting what is wrong now in clear simple ways and trusting people to make an informed decision about the project.

5. Anything else you want to say.
Having done a personality profile on our governing body we all had a lot of similarities and I think there are certain types of people who have a predilection to volunteering – and I am definitely one of them. Perhaps it fills a need in me that I don’t get from my work / family life – but I know that I love doing it and I can’t imagine what I’d do without it. Everyone asks me how I manage to fit it all in, and my answer is I make time. This involves juggling my time and making sure I prioritise effectively. Everyone who knows me knows I love my sleep and I really need a good 8 hours minimum each night to function well and this means that I have to use my day and evenings wisely to fit everything in. I am also very lucky that my husband and son allow me the time to do my ‘hobbies’.

Collecting #climateemergency signatures for the first time: scary, but ultimately okay!

Marion Smith, a new Climate Emergency Manchester supporter, writes.

I hate to admit it, but I am not the kind of person who enjoys being stopped on the street – I’m shy, more than a little socially anxious, and have been known to pre-emptively walk in the other direction if I notice a charity volunteer clocking eye contact with me. It wasn’t until last Friday (14 June), when I went out collecting signatures with Climate Emergency Manchester for the first time, that I had given any thought to how it feels to be on the other side of the equation.

IMG_5142.jpg
Fridays for Future, 14th June 2019

I’d been so enthusiastic to begin working with CEM that I hadn’t really given any thought about what collecting signatures would actually entail- I just knew that it was a vitally important cause and that I wanted to be involved in some way. This meant that until I was standing outside the Central Library at Fridays for Future Manchester, complete with my clipboard, pen and flyers, it hadn’t occurred to me that I would find the process of approaching strangers on the street difficult.

And it was difficult, particularly at first- I’d find myself looking surprised when someone would actually stop and allow me to talk to them, and I’d only just manage to mumble out what the petition was and why people should be signing it- I’m pretty sure the first few signees only did so out of a sense of pity for me! However, the more signatures I collected, the more I realised and accepted that not everyone is going to stop regardless of how charismatic you appear. It’s a lottery of who’s going to stop and listen to your cause, and although some people will ignore you or respond a little abruptly, there are also people who genuinely listen and actively respond.

I spoke to a number of the (lovely) people at Fridays For Future, and one man who was leafletting said to me that he’d been coming for months and watching on the sidelines, and had only just felt comfortable handing out leaflets recently- he assured me that as far as he was concerned, I was really throwing myself in the deep end with signature collection, but that I was doing a good job. Ultimately, I filled up my signature sheet, and although it doesn’t feel to me like I did particularly well, I’m just going to take his word for it, and believe that I’ll get better at collecting signatures the more I do it. Approaching strangers on the street may not be something I find easy, but none of the causes we campaign for relating to climate breakdown are ever going to be comfortable, and I’m just grateful that there were so many reassuring, encouraging people around me for my introduction to signature collecting.

Marion Smith
I’m a 21-year-old Music Postgrad at the University of Manchester, and have recently joined CEM. Although climate change is a word I have been aware of for most of my life, it has only been in the past year that I’ve felt able to comprehend the true effects and consequences of climate breakdown- this realisation has led to me seeking out groups like Climate Emergency Manchester, as although I have made changes to my own lifestyle, I firmly believe that change will come through the scrutinisation and holding of organisations and corporations to account over issues of climate change.